Organisational Change following Implementation of Processes

Organisational Change following Implementation of Processes

Tony (not his real name) runs a central administration team. This team liaises with individual teams in business units, which report locally. There was good support for process change both in the central and the business unit teams and with customers, primarily because of real involvement and consultation from the start and the obvious need for improvement. Process designs, system builds and implementations went well. However once new processes were implemented it was clear that some organisational change was necessary as resources could be redeployed and process managers were required, but somehow attempts to implement the changes were forestalled and relations between the central and business unit teams deteriorated.

It appears that the business unit managers feel threatened by what they perceive as a takeover of control by the central unit manager. This is because they think that the central unit manager is reluctant to appoint a process manager who is not a direct report; despite this if a local manager is a logical appointee as process manager the local manager wants recognition of the expansion of responsibilities before taking on a process manager role in addition to their other responsibilities. There has been no resolution because it has been easier to avoid the issue.
Because the lines of control are separated this issue will only be resolved at an executive level. Leadership is required to negotiate a resolution, Tony or his boss needs to bring the parties together and go through all of the issues and work towards a solution. This has not happened because other priorities can always be pointed to as more important – after all there is no loss here, merely sub-optimisation.

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